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Contact Details

Tel:(011) 726 2886 

Fax:(011) 482 1213 

No.24  Cnr 1st Ave 
& Main St 
Melville 
Johannesburg 
2092

Consulting Hours

Mondays-Fridays 

07:30-12:00 15:00-18:30

Saturday 

09:30-12:00 

Sundays & Public Holidays 

09:30-11:00 

Vetdirectory

 

Focus of the month

SPAY AND NEUTER HOME CARE

If a spay/ neuter was performed on your pet today, an antibiotic injection and pain killer was given before the surgery.  Tablets for pain relief after the procedure are available and advisable.  Under special circumstances a course of antibiotics will also be given.

Please look at the incision at least twice a day - redness, swelling, bleeding or a discharge may be causes for concern.

You can offer you pet water when you get home.  If there is no vomiting you can offer a light, bland meal this evening.  We advise the use of th Hills i/d diet for the first few days of recovery.

Activity should be limited to leash walking, preferably until the sutures are removed in 14 days time.

Your pet may lick the wound and pull out the stitches.  We advise the use of a plastic buster collar to prevent this.  Please enquire at reception.

Sutures are removed 14 days after surgery.  This should be done by the vet, NOT at home.

If your pet remains lethargic after the first 24-48 hours after surgery, please consult our vets.

Your pet may have a slight cough in the week after surgery.  This is due to the tube put in the windpipe during anaesthesia.  It should resolve spontaneously, but contact us if you are concerned.

PLEASE CONTACT US IF YOU HAVE ANY CONCERN ABOUT YOUR PET'S WELL-BEING.

 

LOST AND FOUND AT MELVILLE VETERINARY CLINIC:

 

 

 

 

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Arthritis Treatment and prevention - Part 2 of 2

Arthritis

In part one of this two part article, we looked at the signs and diagnoses of arthritis in pets. In this part of the article, we will look at the treatment and prevention of arthritis in pets. With the advancement of technology and medicine, arthritis is no longer a death sentence. Our beloved pets can benefit from a range of surgical and medical treatment. As mentioned in part one, it can never be stopped or cured but arthritis can definitely be managed and symptoms relieved to give your pet a pain free life.



Arthritis Signs and Diagnoses - Part 1 of 2

Arthritis

So what happens when your beloved canine friend does not want to go for his walk anymore because he is too sore the next morning?

Unfortunately older pets, and these days even puppies, get afflicted by a condition commonly known as joint disease. This is the same problem we as humans suffer from as well, better known as arthritis. In dogs and cats and more commonly in larger breed dogs, it is concentrated in the hip, knee, shoulder and elbow joints. The spinal column and back vertebrae (back bones) can also be affected.



Scratch scratch scratch - Part 2 of 2

Skin conditions

In the first part of this two part series we looked at the complexity of itching and scratching in pets and the fact that although the symptoms eventually manifest in the same way i.e. itching and scratching,  there could be many different causes for it. Itching or pruritis, as vets call it, can be described as the sensation that elicits the desire to scratch. The skin, being the biggest organ in the body and acting as a sort of outer nervous system, provides feedback to the brain of things like temperature, touch, pain and itching through a network of nerve endings.



Scratch scratch scratch - Part 1 of 2

Skin conditions

Vets often hear this complaint in the examination room, where clients complain about the incessant itching and scratching of their pets. This is a more common complaint with dogs where the nightly thump, thump, thump of a hind limb hitting the floor keeps the owner and the dog awake for hours. If it is irritating and hard wearing on the owner, then equally so, if not so much more for the affected pet. Skin problems in dogs and cats make up by far the biggest number of cases seen by vets. This is understandable given the fact that the skin is the biggest organ in the body. By definition it is also the organ which has the greatest exposure to the environment.



A killer disease with a misleading name

Catflu

The name of a particular disease is often influenced by the circumstances around the original occurrence of such a disease. For example “sleeping disease” in humans was originally associated with the green fever trees found in low lying areas around South Africa. As time went by and a better understanding of the disease became apparent, it became clear that the disease was transmitted by Tsetse flies and had nothing to do with the trees. Similarly there is a killer disease in dogs with a misleading name – CATFLU. When the disease was first diagnosed in the late 1970’s, it was thought to be a disease transmitted from cats to dogs. Later it was discovered that cats did not harbour the offending organism causing the disease, but an extremely small yet resilient virus called, Parvo virus in actual fact is responsible for the disease.



The worm you did not know about - Spirocerca lupi

Worms

Most people do not know about this little worm. It has a strange and difficult name and an equally strange life-cycle. Normal deworming remedies do not kill this parasite and most people do not even know when their dog is infected with it. This article will try and shed some light on the how, what and where of Spirocerca lupi.

Spirocerca lupi is a roundworm. It is red in colour and 40 – 70 mm long. The eggs contain the larvae and have the shape of a paperclip. The eggs and larvae are passed from one host to another and this process normally starts when an animal passes the eggs in its stools. For example, a dung beetle ingests the eggs while working with or rolling in infected stools. The larvae then hatch inside the dung beetle and develop into more mature forms. A bird, lizard or another small animal might eat the dung beetle and then become infected with the larvae. Your dog will then become infected by eating the bird or lizard, called an intermediate host. This disease has not yet been seen in cats.



Tiny but deadly

Ticks

Living in a warm and sunny country is great, but with it comes all the parasites and diseases associated with a warm and/or tropical climate. One of these little scourges can be found nearly all over South Africa, namely ticks. Most people have at some or other time encountered a tick on their pet. This can be quite distressing – especially if you consider a disease like biliary (tick fever).



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