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Tel:(011) 726 2886 

Fax:(011) 482 1213 

No.24  Cnr 1st Ave 
& Main St 
Melville 
Johannesburg 
2092

Consulting Hours

Mondays-Fridays 

07:30-12:00 15:00-18:30

Saturday 

09:30-12:00 

Sundays & Public Holidays 

09:30-11:00 

Vetdirectory

 

Focus of the month

SPAY AND NEUTER HOME CARE

If a spay/ neuter was performed on your pet today, an antibiotic injection and pain killer was given before the surgery.  Tablets for pain relief after the procedure are available and advisable.  Under special circumstances a course of antibiotics will also be given.

Please look at the incision at least twice a day - redness, swelling, bleeding or a discharge may be causes for concern.

You can offer you pet water when you get home.  If there is no vomiting you can offer a light, bland meal this evening.  We advise the use of th Hills i/d diet for the first few days of recovery.

Activity should be limited to leash walking, preferably until the sutures are removed in 14 days time.

Your pet may lick the wound and pull out the stitches.  We advise the use of a plastic buster collar to prevent this.  Please enquire at reception.

Sutures are removed 14 days after surgery.  This should be done by the vet, NOT at home.

If your pet remains lethargic after the first 24-48 hours after surgery, please consult our vets.

Your pet may have a slight cough in the week after surgery.  This is due to the tube put in the windpipe during anaesthesia.  It should resolve spontaneously, but contact us if you are concerned.

PLEASE CONTACT US IF YOU HAVE ANY CONCERN ABOUT YOUR PET'S WELL-BEING.

 

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Urination problems in cats - Part 2 of 2

Territorial marking and Urine elimination

In part 1 of this article we looked at the difference between urine marking and inappropriate elimination in cats, and urine marking was discussed in more depth. In this article we will look at the reasons for inappropriate elimination as well as the diagnosis and treatment of both inappropriate elimination and urine marking.  



Urination problems in cats - Part 1 of 2

Territorial marking and Urine elimination

Ask any cat owner and they will tell you that cats are not just small little dogs. So naturally a fair amount of the medical problems cats suffer from are unique to this species. In this two part series we are going to explore one of the more common problems that affect cats.



Getting the most from your visit to the vet

Visit to the vet

Everybody wants value for money. No one will deny that it is no different when taking your pets to the vet. We love our four legged and feathered friends dearly, but like everything else in life, most of us have to budget for their expenses, and make sure we derive as much value out of a visit to the vet as possible.

The starting point of deriving value for money is to be courteous to the staff working in a veterinary practice. Being rude and obnoxious with the staff of the veterinary practice (especially the reception and support staff) will not endear you or your pets to them, and if you get their hackles up before the vets have even seen your animal, the total experience of visiting the vet is likely to be compromised in the long run.



We're all going on a Summer Holiday

Traveling with your pets

Going on holiday is always fun but we must never forget or neglect our pets in the excitement leading up to a well deserved vacation.

When going on holiday find someone to look after your pets while you are away. It will be a good idea either to get a house sitter or place your pets in a kennel over the holidays as medical problems can just as easily arise when you are not at home. Giving the vet notice of your impending holiday and making arrangements for someone to take your pets there in case of an emergency is an important part of your holiday planning. Also stock up on enough food and make sure your pet has enough medicine if they are on chronic medication.



Your pet's once a year health check-up

Annual Check up

Many people wonder why vets recommend having a once a year check-up for pets. There are many reasons but probably the most important is that the average dog or cat ages by approximately seven “dog/cat years” for every human year. It may differ slightly from breed to breed and usually cats and small breed dogs age slower than large breed dogs. The average life expectancy of a large breed dog is about twelve years whereas cats and smaller breed dogs can quite comfortably live to eighteen years. Just like in humans where the average life expectancy has increased dramatically over the last twenty years because of better healthcare, proper nutrition and a general improvement in living conditions, so has the life expectancy of our pets. Animals which are kept as domestic pets live a much more sheltered lifestyle than their wild counterparts, where there is little protection from natural predators and harsh environmental conditions. Nutrition for pets has also become a much more advanced science than in years gone by and these days it is quite common to find specialised diets for life stages, breed types and conditions. The average quality of life and life expectancy in large breed dogs who suffer from arthritis has been substantially increased because of specialised diets catering for their particular needs.



Behaviour difficulties

Behaviour

“Man’s best friend.” The reason why dogs have been described like this over centuries is because of their unwavering loyalty and their good nature towards humans. However now and again, behavioural problems crop up in pet dogs which cause many people to dispute whether dogs are really man’s best friend. Behavioural problems can range from aggression, to destructive behaviour like chewing and digging, to house soiling. Some of these problems can be blamed on uninformed and uninvolved owners who do not spend the time to properly socialise and do basic training when they first acquire their dogs as puppies.



Vaccinating your puppy and kitten

Vaccination

Getting a new puppy or kitten is always exciting and most of us just want to cuddle this cute little bundle of fur. It would be lovely if this were enough to keep them healthy and disease free forever but unfortunately it isn't. Just like human children, animal babies also need immunization when they are very young.

A newborn puppy or kitten isn't naturally immune. They do have some antibody protection that they received through the mother's blood via the placenta, but this is roughly only 10%. The other 90% is through the first milk they take in from their mother. This milk is called first milk or colostrum because only the milk produced in the first two days after birth contain antibodies (called maternal antibodies). These antibodies are like little soldiers standing ready to counter any attack from a virus (the enemy). The intestinal lining of the newborn starts changing 6 hours after birth and starts losing the ability to absorb these antibodies.  It is therefore very important for new puppies and kittens to start suckling as soon as possible after birth. The newborn is only able to absorb these maternal antibodies for the first two days of its' life. Proper vaccination of the mother will ensure that she has proper antibodies levels which can then be passed on to her babies. If for some reason the puppy or kitten did not receive this precious colostrum (fostered pets, bottle fed pets or perhaps failure of the mother to produce milk), they will be at a greater risk of contracting disease.



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